Tag Archives: Internet

ACM Web Science 2015 take-away

Here are some ideas and things I remember from the The 2015 ACM Web Science conference WebSci’15 held at the Oxford e-Research Centre and Keble College :

Membrane metphore

Markus Strohmaier used an intriguing metaphor for talking about the Web. He said it was a membrane. So the Web is  like thin pliable sheet that cover and connect us. This metaphor bring some biological, living connotation to the Web and how we see it.  This echo in my own research on everyday life and the Internet. Seigworth and Gardiner (2004) remind us that we must reintroduce “life” in everyday life studies. The authors argue that cultural studies have stiffened by only using part of the organic metaphor :the skeleton, and leaving aside the soft tissues. Seigworth and Gardiner (2004) propose to take into account the “soft tissue”: the imperceptible, flexible and  mobile circulation  in the body. Fully reintroduce the “life” in everyday life would then consider its moments, its movements, and its multiplicities different materials, not just the big rigid structure.

Best quote used in a presentation :

“Big data is like teenage sex: everyone talks about it, nobody really knows how to do it, everyone thinks everyone else is doing it, so everyone claims they are doing it.” – Dan Ariely

Prospography vs ANT theory

It is interesting to see how other discipline study the Web, for instance people in the humanities :

Archetypal Narratives in Social Machines: Approaching Sociality through Prosopography Segolene Tarte, Pip Willcox, Hugh Glaser and David De Roure

In this paper, they used prosopography. According to wikipedia it is an investigation of the common characteristics of a historical group, whose individual biographies may be largely untraceable, by means of a collective study of their lives, in multiple career-line analysis.[1] Prosopographical research has the goal of learning about patterns of relationships and activities through the study of collective biography; it collects and analyses statistically relevant quantities of biographical data about a well-defined group of individuals. This makes it a valuable technique for studying many pre-modern societies.

Instead of opening the black box and analyze what all the actors are doing, those researcher build the archetypal narrative using a Jungian approach. So they do a biography of the infrastructure.

A need to understand the contexts

The big take away from the conference, is that the issue of context. A lot of data is over-analyzed and under-contextualized.

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Seigworth, G., & Gardiner, M. (2004). Rethinking everyday life: And then nothing turns itself inside out. Cultural Studies, 18(2-3), 139-159. doi: 10.1080/0950238042000201455

Partager pour s’exprimer

Le jeudi 20 mars 2014 j’ai présenté au colloque interuniversitaire de l’AEMDC (l’Association des étudiants (es) à la maîtrise et au doctorat en communication de l’UQAM) J’étais dans le panel sur la présentation de soi.

Voici un résumé de ma présentation sur le partage de vidéo comme moyen d’expression: Depuis l’apparition du Web 2.0, beaucoup d’attention a été portée sur les notions telles que la présentation de soi, la surveillance et le voyeurisme, mais je suggère que d’autres aspects seraient profitables à explorer comme celle du partage. Cette communication invite à s’intéresser aux pratiques communicationnelles des internautes à travers le partage de vidéo en ligne. En effet, en 2013, 78 % des internautes regardent ou téléchargent des vidéos en ligne (Purcell, 2013). En 2011, 500 tweets publiés par minute contenaient un lien YouTube, et plus de 150 ans vidéo YouTube ont été visionnés sur Facebook chaque jour (Li, Wang, Liu, & Xu, 2012).

Le partage de lien YouTube sur Twitter et Facebook

Le partage de lien YouTube sur Twitter et Facebook

Qu’est-ce qui motive les internautes à autant partager des vidéos en ligne ?

Concernant les réseaux sociaux numériques, beaucoup de gens partagent des vidéos pour vanter leur accomplissement de découverte ou recommander un contenu (Bondad-Brown, Rice, & Pearce, 2012). Cette communication montrera que d’autres motivations existent. Nous verrons comment le partage de vidéos s’imbrique dans une danse complexe entre contenus, individus et contextes à travers des exemples d’internautes exprimant émotion, idée, et argument. Plus précisément, nous explorons comment le partage de vidéo est plus qu’une présentation de soi ou une recommandation, mais une forme d’ouverture aux autres.

  • Les internautes partagent des vidéos en ligne pour exprimer

Leurs goûts
Leur valeurs
Leurs émotions

  • Les internautes veulent partager l’émotion ressentie par le visionnement de la vidéo :

 Je pense qu’’il attendait la même réaction, un genre de ah ! » (Nathalie, 3e entrevue).

  • Les internautes utlisent les vidéos en ligne pour s’exprimer au-delà des mots

On a eu une discussion avec des mots beaucoup plus simple, mais j’ai saisi qu’il avait compris ce que je voulais dire, parce qu’on avait la même façon de s’expliquer les choses. Oui, c’est poétique. C’est très beau.  (Sandrine, 3e entrevue)

conclusion

Quelques motivations à partager

 

 

Comunicación audiovisual e Internet

On the 19th of April I did my first online conference.

In our round table about television and Internet, we were 3 participants and a moderator, Ana María Pérez Guerrero.

It was a very interesting experience since I was the only one who did not speak Spanish. Everybody was kind enough to translate and ask me questions. And I got compliments about my subject and methodology. 

I also try Twitting live, so that was fun too. I got 2 new followers :

@Loreneando Estudiante de Comunicación Audiovisual. Con mil proyectos en la cabeza y sin dejar de soñar. Luna de Valencia · http://www.loreneando.jimdo.com

@OmarJuanIetum  Mercenario audiovisual…

Here is my abstract : 

The phenomenon of the social web (Web 2.0) and the proliferation of devices that are always connected to the Internet, such as smartphones, are transforming Internet studies. Nowadays, studying online and offline activities separately is unthinkable, since the Internet plays such a great part of everyday life (boyd & Ellison, 2007).  The same is true about computer and telephone. For example, user can start an email on their smart phone and finish it on their computer. Reflecting on abundance of online audio-visual content, several questions may be raised: How certain video become viral? Why do people want to share certain type of video?

For this paper, I will use my current work for my PhD thesis that explores the role of online videos in interpersonal communications and groups of users. Videos are an unavoidable Internet phenomenon (Purcell, 2010). Videos move from one site to another, from computer to phone, they are spread through word of mouth, and broadcast on television. This paper examines how people decide to post a video on their Facebook wall or friend’s wall. It shows that it can be done to share information, a feeling or an experience.

Each individual has a unique practice and motivation for sharing online video, whether through a social networking site, by email, showing it directly to a friend and family member. This paper aims to better understand why ordinary people share online videos via social networking sites. The data used in this paper is from semi-structured and open interviews. I proceed by conducting three interviews per participant, allowing the construction of a dialogue. During the first interview, I asked participants to simply describe their everyday experiences related to online videos. A second interview allows me to elaborate on some details. The last meeting is directly inspired by the notion of reflective practices (Finlay, 2002) and I make a first analysis of previous meetings. Thus, researcher and participant discuss the initial interpretations and the research process.

boyd, d., & Ellison, N. B. (2007). Social network sites: Definition, history, and scholarship. Journal of Computer Mediated Communication, 13(1), 210-230.

Finlay, L. (2002). Negotiating the swamp: the opportunity and challenge of reflexivity in research practice. Qualitative Research, 2(2), 209-230.

Hine, C. (2011). Towards ethnography of television on the internet: A mobile strategy for exploring mundane interpretive activities. Media, Culture & Society, 33(4), 567-582.

Purcell, K. (2010). The state of online video: Pew Internet & American Life Project.